What are the dog bite laws in Florida?

Florida is a “strict liability” state, meaning that an owner can be held liable for a dog bite, even if they did not previously know of the aggressive nature of the animal. More importantly, Florida's dog bite laws don't require the victim to prove that their injuries were the result of the owner's negligence.

What are the dog bite laws in Florida?

Florida is a “strict liability” state, meaning that an owner can be held liable for a dog bite, even if they did not previously know of the aggressive nature of the animal. More importantly, Florida's dog bite laws don't require the victim to prove that their injuries were the result of the owner's negligence. Florida is a state of strict liability when it comes to dog bites. In other words, a Florida dog owner can be held liable if their dog bites someone, even if the owner had no prior knowledge or warning that the dog might bite.

Section 767.04 specifically states that the owner of the dog is liable for damages suffered by persons bitten, regardless of the dog's prior cruelty or the owners' knowledge of such cruelty. Dogs are not intrinsically dangerous, but in Florida, dog owners are fully responsible for their pet's actions. Florida is what is known as a “strict liability” state (Florida Statute Section 767.0) when it comes to dog bites. That means that as long as the person is legally visiting a public or private place, and the owner's dog bites that person, the owner is responsible for their injuries, even if the owner had no reason to suspect that the dog would bite.

Injured parties do not have to prove liability in these cases; liability is inherent. If someone was injured by a dog other than being bitten, they have to prove that the owner's negligence caused their injury). Within 14 days after the issuance of the final order classifying the dog as dangerous or the conclusion of any appeal confirming such final order, obtain a registration certificate for the dog from the animal control authority serving the area in which you reside and renew the certificate annually. If a timely hearing is not requested with regard to the classification of dangerous dogs or the proposed sanction, the determination of the animal control authority as to such a matter shall become final.

If you try to file your lawsuit after the four-year deadline has passed, the court will almost certainly dismiss it, unless circumstances call for a rare extension of the filing deadline. Classification of dogs as dangerous; certification of registration; notification and hearing requirements; animal confinement; exemption; appeals; unlawful acts. B) In order to protect the health, safety and general welfare of the public, the local exemption procedure will require participating public food service establishments to request and receive a permit from the local government governing body before allowing customers' dogs to enter their premises. You can be held liable if your dog attacks another dog and the owner of the other dog is injured protecting his dog.

Reasonable Efforts to Notify Identified Owners of Lost or Stray Dogs and Cats within 48 Hours of Identification. Please note that this sign will not protect the owner if the victim of the dog bite is under the age of six or if the owner was negligent in relation to the incident. If the dog's bite resulted in permanent disability or disfigurement, such as scarring, loss of visual abilities, or permanent nerve damage, uneconomic costs of pain and suffering can also be sought in an agreement, because that single incident will affect that person's self-esteem and ability to enjoy activities for the rest of their lives. Any dog used as a service dog for the blind, hearing impaired or disabled that bites another animal or a human being is exempt from any quarantine requirement after such bite if the dog has a rabies vaccine currently administered by a licensed veterinarian.

Every state has laws on the books that limit the time a person has to file a lawsuit after an injury. If you are a victim of a dog bite, you can seek and recover monetary compensation for injuries and damages that may have cost you money, such as medical bills and lost wages. Beyond the risk of a dog bite lawsuit, dog owners must deal with the “Dangerous Dog Act” that can lead to criminal charges in certain situations. Therefore, it is stated that it is public policy of the state for animal control agencies and humanitarian organizations to adopt policies and procedures to help return lost cats or dogs to identified owners.

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Molly Armstong
Molly Armstong

Amateur beer scholar. Subtly charming beer evangelist. Incurable pop culture enthusiast. Devoted tv nerd. Hipster-friendly internet fanatic. Incurable web nerd.