What happens when you request animal control for a dog bite in Florida?

A) An animal that is the subject of an investigation into dangerous dogs due to serious injury to a human being may be immediately confiscated by an animal control authority, quarantined, if necessary, for an appropriate time, or seized and held. Yes, animal control has the legal right to euthanize dogs in its custody.

What happens when you request animal control for a dog bite in Florida?

A) An animal that is the subject of an investigation into dangerous dogs due to serious injury to a human being may be immediately confiscated by an animal control authority, quarantined, if necessary, for an appropriate time, or seized and held. Yes, animal control has the legal right to euthanize dogs in its custody. But they don't have the right to kill your pet without probable cause. Animal control is likely to stop your dog waiting for a bite.

In some cases, you may be able to stop this if you are at the scene during the animal's attack (such as at a dog park) or if the people involved don't want to press charges (if the bite was minor). More than half of dog bites involving people aged 15 and older occurred when the victim tried to interrupt a dogfight. Doctors are not required to report dog bites to the police department, but if a dog bite victim shows up at the doctor's office or hospital, the doctor must report the bite to the state health department or animal control agency after a detailed report and treatment. The best approach as a dog owner is to be proactive and keep your pet out of the custody of animal control by following all local laws.

To recover the common law, the plaintiff must prove that the dog owner's negligence caused the injury. These incidents occurred most frequently at the dog owner's home or property (55 percent), but also occurred frequently off the property. The majority of dog bites (86 percent) involving children under the age of 6 were from dogs known to the family, and more than half occurred at home. Florida is what is known as a “strict liability” state (Florida Statute Section 767.0) when it comes to dog bites.

One defense that many dog owners will defend is that they warned anyone who entered their property that the dog could harm them. Many homeowners and renters insurance policies in Fort Lauderdale and elsewhere in Florida do cover dog bite injuries. A “light bite” for you can be a distressing event for another person; you may want the animal to be admitted and evaluated for its own safety. An injured dog bite victim may have to pay the costs of outpatient care and hospitalization, surgery or various surgeries (including plastic surgery or amputation), stitches, medications, prosthetics, physical therapy and rehabilitation, doctor visits, specialized care, imaging tests such as x-rays and more.

At the scene, get the dog's owner's name, address, phone number, insurance company, and any other relevant contact information, just as you would at the scene of a car accident. If human life is in immediate danger, police or animal control teams can kill a dog on the spot or reassure it. For more guidance on how to avoid dog bites and national and local dog bite prevention campaigns, see the links below in the More Information section. If you suffered a dog bite injury in Florida, here are some steps you can take to make it more likely that you can recover the full amount of damages you deserve.

Florida is a “strict liability” state, meaning that an owner can be held liable for a dog bite, even if they did not previously know of the aggressive nature of the animal.

Molly Armstong
Molly Armstong

Amateur beer scholar. Subtly charming beer evangelist. Incurable pop culture enthusiast. Devoted tv nerd. Hipster-friendly internet fanatic. Incurable web nerd.